9 Important Lessons Learned after Generating $150 Million in Sales over These Last 8 Years—Part 2

Thank you to everyone who commented on Part 1 of this series (which you can access HERE). Here are the next 3 big lessons I’ve learned on my business journey so far: 4) Trust No One Fully I know this one sounds very pessimistic. I prefer to call it realistic. It’s a fact of life […]

The post 9 Important Lessons Learned after Generating $150 Million in Sales over These Last 8 Years—Part 2 appeared first on MOBE – My Own Business Education.

Thank you to everyone who commented on Part 1 of this series (which you can access HERE). Here are the next 3 big lessons I’ve learned on my business journey so far: 4) Trust No One Fully I know this one sounds very pessimistic. I ...Read More

5 Essential (But Unexpected) Business Lessons Learned After 5 Years of Running DigitalMarketer [Part 1 of 3]

(This is Part 1 of our 3-part anniversary series! Once you’ve finished this post, check out Part 2 and Part 3.)

DigitalMarketer officially turns 5 this month! Yay, us!

I’ll get right into it…

My original plan was to write a long blog post recalling the early days of DM…

  • Where we’ve been.
  • Where we’ve gone.
  • Where we’re going.

But then I realized something very, very important. (And pay attention, because this is a good marketing lesson.)

I realized that you probably don’t care.

I’m not saying you’re cruel or heartless.

I’m just betting you care way, WAY more about getting your company to 5 years (or through another 5 years) than you care about celebrating the fact that our business is 5-years-old.

And that’s ok.

You should care more about your company than mine. And to the extent that you do care about DigitalMarketer’s mission and values, that’s likely because they align with your own mission and values.

And again…

…that’s ok!

So what follows in this post isn’t a “walk down memory lane.” It isn’t some boring slide show of someone else’s vacation, nor is it an endless stream of pics of other people’s kids clogging up your Facebook feed.

Instead, what follows is a brief summary of the key lessons I’ve learned in getting a company to its 5th birthday. And specifically, the 3 things you can largely IGNORE — that most people believe are essential — during your first 5 years.

(NOTE: Later in this series, I’ll deliver the opposite and share what your company absolutely MUST HAVE early on if it’s going to succeed.)

First, let’s start with…

All The Stuff You Don’t Need to Have Figured Out When You Get Started:

1. A Logo

Don’t get me wrong…a good logo and a good brand is important.

It just isn’t essential.

Lesson #1: Discerning the difference between what is truly essential and what is merely important is a critical skill for growing a successful company.

Some of DM’s early logos were screenshots from Microsoft Word docs (fancy!).

Others included unlicensed clip art, and one was purchased off a 99designs gig for $60. (That one was actually my favorite until someone said it looked like an alien with a GIANT PHALLUS. Unfortunately it’s been lost into the abyss as many wonderful things are, otherwise you’d better believe I’d be sharing it with you here.)

Check this one out…

And this one…

digi-dm-logo

And another…

dmlogo-old2

Obviously, we weren’t even close to being there.

It wasn’t until 2013 (late into our 3rd year) that we finally settled on our current logo…

dm-logo-current

Lesson #2: Spend 99% of your time, especially during your first year in business, focused on selling and serving your customers. If you spend your first year focused on logos and branding, you likely won’t need either, because you won’t have a business to brand.

(SALE: Always be the smartest marketer in the room by growing your business with the best tactics, strategy, and tools available to you—start with our best selling Execution Plans and Certifications.)

blackfriday-emailbanner

2. A Business Model

This is probably going to shock a lot of people, but yes, I’m suggesting that when you first get started, you don’t need to know exactly what you’re going to do or how your’e going to do it.

For example…

In 2011, DigitalMarketer sold one-off courses that I produced. Obviously that wasn’t scalable…

…so in 2012 we pivoted to publishing other experts’ courses. That was more scalable, but the quality was “iffy” (to put it kindly)…

…so that same year we launched our first subscription business. That was a better business model, but we missed on the pricing (too expensive) and product/market fit, so we had to abandon that model.

Then in 2013 we got into the event and coaching business. That made lots of money, but margins sucked.

Also, we ran into scale issues again, because to grow we had to bring on more coaches, and, candidly, there just aren’t that many people on planet Earth who are truly equipped to deliver marketing and business growth advice.

So that same year (2013), we pivoted into services, but again, we couldn’t scale the business, and margins were even worse than the event and coaching model.

As 2013 rolled into 2014, we were stuck.

We still didn’t have a business model that was working, and we were completely out of ideas. It was at this moment of desperation that we asked an interesting, and some might argue, OBVIOUS, question…

“What do we actually do best?”

That was it.

We simply took a step back, and as a team we asked ourselves, “What do we do best?”

NOT… “What do we want to do?”

NOT… “What do we think people will buy?”

Instead, we asked, “Where can we add value?” and “Where do we DESERVE to win because we’re truly great?”

Answering this question led to the creation and launch of DigitalMarketer Lab.

Because at the end of the day, what we’re truly best at is building marketing systems based on actually doing this stuff.

And so that’s what we built. And that’s what we sold. And customers signed up by the thousands.

So by the end of 2014, we finally had our “business model”…it just took 4 years. So if you don’t have your model figured out yet, don’t fret. It took us a while, too.

Oh yeah, and the model is still evolving.

In 2015, we pivoted into the certification and professional education space, only this time it wasn’t at the exclusion of our existing business model. It was IN ADDITION to what we were already doing.

And we were making this pivot to serve a new market, but we’ll talk more on market selection in just a minute.

Lesson #4: It’s ok if you don’t have it all figured out. Stay lean (so you’re able to make lots of pivots) and keep your focus on where you can truly add value…not only on what you believe the market wants.

3. A Team

If you’ve been following this blog for the last month or so, my suggestion that you don’t need to have “the right people on the bus” in the early stages of your business will sound a bit odd.

In fact, I’m sure I’ll get lots of disagreement on this point.

So let me be clear: Having a great team is important. Very important.

(It’s so important I even wrote a blog post explaining how to build your marketing dream team.)

But having that team in place Day 1 (or even Day 366) is NOT essential. And I can say that, because out of all the team members that were working at DigitalMarketer when we first launched back in 2011, only 1, Richard Lindner, remains today.

Some of our team members moved on to other companies that we own.

Some moved on to other companies in our industry.

Some moved on to start their own ventures, and yes…

Some were fired.

So as important as a team is, I can attest to the fact that it is NOT essential. And if you think about it, it makes sense…

How can you know who you need until you know who you are?

In other words, until you have clearly identified your business model, you can’t be certain of who should be on your team.

So what do you do?

The answer: You “settle.”

I’m not suggesting you “settle” on lazy or dishonest people. I’m suggesting you “settle” for smart, hard-working people who sincerely give a damn. And then you do your best to train them the best you can so they can do the job you’re asking them to do.

But let’s be honest with one another…

Unless your company is massively-funded by a well known VC, the chances of you recruiting “rock-star-ninja-all-knowing-all-powerful-superhero” people is slim at best when your company is still small and unproven.

And the fact is, you don’t want them. Not yet.

In the early days, you want scrappers. You want hustlers. You want pirates.

You want people who don’t get huffy if the coffee machine breaks. In fact, you want people who will buy their own damn coffee!

So don’t stress about the team.

Keep payroll as low as you can stand until you figure out how your company is going to make money, and then scale your team only when you absolutely need more warm bodies. And in the meantime, in the immortal words of Stephen Stills…

“If you can’t be with the one you love…love the one you’re with!”

And then you give them all the love, support, and training you can muster.

Lesson #5: It’s ok if your startup team isn’t perfect. Neither are you. So enjoy the craziness of it all. Except their weaknesses and ask that they accept yours, and you just might grow a superstar from the ground up.

So to summarize…

Lesson #1: Learn to discern the difference between what is truly essential, and what is merely important.

Lesson #2: Spend 99% of your time, especially during your first year in business, focused on selling and serving your customers. If you spend your first year focused on logos and branding, you likely won’t need either, because you won’t have a business to brand.

Lesson #3: There’s a big difference between making money and keeping money. Get good at keeping money, because cashflow is the #1 killer of most small businesses.

Lesson #4: Don’t wait until you have your business model figured out before you start trying. Your first idea probably won’t work, so have a Plan B, Plan C, Plan D, etc…and keep your business as lean as possible so you can afford to pivot early and often.

Lesson #5: Accept and embrace your team’s imperfections. Grow together, because whether you realize it or not, you likely need them more than they need you.

And the FINAL LESSON

Don’t concern yourself with (admittedly) important matters such as company branding, business models, and even your team. While those things are very important, they aren’t essential…at least not in the early days of your business.

At this point you might be wondering, “If none of those things are truly essential, then what is?”
That’s a great question, but I’ll have to leave the answer for another blog post. Right now, I need to get back to work.

The next 5 years aren’t going to happen on their own.

(NOTE: Always be the smartest marketer in the room by growing your business with the best tactics, strategy, and tools available to you—start with our best selling Execution Plans and Certifications.)

The post 5 Essential (But Unexpected) Business Lessons Learned After 5 Years of Running DigitalMarketer [Part 1 of 3] appeared first on DigitalMarketer.

(This is Part 1 of our 3-part anniversary series! Once you’ve finished this post, check out Part 2 and Part 3.)

DigitalMarketer officially turns 5 this month! Yay, us!

I’ll get right into it…

My original plan was to write a long blog post recalling ...Read More

How To Build A Marketing Dream Team For Your Brand (Even If You Aren’t A Marketer)

How would you describe your marketing team?

  • Understaffed?
  • Overworked?
  • Undertrained?
  • Non-existent?

The fact is that digital marketing is no longer an optional extra for small businesses, but even the best business owners don’t have time to figure all this stuff out.

That’s why every business on Planet Earth needs professional marketers on their team.

This digital marketing “stuff” has become too complicated for one person to handle — particularly if they are also trying to run a business.

Make no mistake, DigitalMarketer is not only the name of our business — it’s a career. According to Yahoo! Finance, digital marketers have an earning potential of $209,755 with 12% of these pros earning more than 150,000 annually.

hire-a-marketing-team-img1

Even the entry-level salary is more than 73K. Not pocket change.

But don’t worry, when you finish this article you’ll know what roles you need to hire to build your own internal marketing team and (as a BONUS) they won’t cost you nearly as much.

Step 1 – Understand the Structure of the Modern Marketing Team

 These are the three roles that must be present in every modern marketing team (even if you’re a team of one):

  • Content Team – Responsible for building content (blog posts, podcasts, videos, etc.).
  • Acquisition Team – Responsible for generating new leads and front-end sales.
  • Monetization Team – Responsible for transforming leads and front-end sales into customers.

If your marketing team is non-existent, the first milestone is to hire a single individual responsible for each of these three core responsibilities.

As your company grows, so too will your org chart. At DigitalMarketer, we have 12 employees (and growing) on the marketing team:

hire-a-marketing-team-img2

Alright, let’s look at a breakdown of the titles in this org chart:

  • Editorial Director – responsible for directing the content and social media strategy from the top of the funnel (Awareness) to the bottom of the funnel (Conversion). (Learn more about Content Marketing here)
    • Blog Editor – (may also be called the Managing Editor) responsible for the ideation, scheduling, and coordination of content on the blog.
    • Video Editor – responsible for managing the video presence including all top-of-funnel video content.
    • Social Media Manager – responsible for managing the brand’s social presence on appropriate social channels such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.
    • Community Manager – responsible for the management of private communities. (May not be applicable to your business.)
  • Director of Acquisition – responsible for directing lead generation and initial customer acquisition strategy and campaigns. (Learn more about Acquisition, Activation and Monetization here)
    • Traffic Manager – responsible for the execution of organic and paid traffic strategy and campaigns.
    • Analytics Manager – responsible for tracking key marketing analytics and key performance indicators (KPI’s) for intercompany departments, then compiling and communicating this data to appropriate members and departments.
    • Graphic Designer – responsible for the creation of advertising graphics for paid media, social media, and original images for the blog.
  • Director of Monetization – responsible for maximizing the revenue generated from all assets, including but not limited to customer lists and all web and media properties.
    • Email Marketing Manager – responsible for executing email marketing strategy and campaigns.
    • Optimization Manager – responsible for proactive and reactionary strategic testing to increase conversion rates.

In the beginning, you’ll have a single person in charge of editorial or acquisition or monetization. As your business evolves, you might find a need for more granular roles such as separate Traffic Managers for Facebook and Google traffic.

Step 2 – Write Job Descriptions and KPI’s For Each Role

Taking the time to write proper job descriptions and KPI’s makes everything easier.

Easier because the employee knows what is expected and the manager knows what to expect. It’s worth of bit of the time and energy it takes to create them.

A proper job description has 5 parts:

  • General information (Name, title, direct reports, etc.)
  • Job Purpose
  • Key Responsibilities & Accountabilities
  • Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s)
  • Personal Characteristics

Here’s the full job description and key performance indicators for our Data Analyst role:

Name: Mark Etingpro  
Title
: Data Analyst
Reports to: Director of Acquisition
Direct Reports:
N/A
Based at:
DM HQ – Austin, TX

Job Purpose:

As a data analyst, you’re responsible for tracking both key marketing analytics as well as key performance indicators for intercompany departments, then compiling and communicating this data to appropriate members and departments.

You’re also responsible for identifying trends in data that may reflect an opportunity or possible weakness in the business. This includes, but is not limited to, metrics such as churn rate for continuity programs, performance of media campaigns, and success of promotions.

You will have a constant pulse on the business and focus not only on gathering and presenting data, but constantly checking the quality and efficacy of the data we’re collecting to help DigitalMarketer best reach it’s goals.

Key Responsibilities & Accountabilities:

  • Work with VP of Marketing and President to establish and evaluate the data that should be tracked to measure both long and short term company goals.
  • Interpret and analyze high level company data (continuity churn rate, paid media performance, promotional performance, etc.)
  • Provide ongoing reports and dashboards for each department of the company that reflects their KPIs/goals along with overall company goals.
  • Develop and implement data collection systems and other strategies that optimize statistical efficiency and data quality.
  • Identify, analyze, and interpret trends or patterns, and communicate those findings along with suggestions for improvements or changes to the appropriate department head.
  • Consistent attention to finding trends in data that will reveal new opportunities or glaring weaknesses within the company.

Key Performance Indicators

Monitoring improvement of the following key metrics above the steady baseline:

  • DigitalMarketer Lab churn rate
  • DigitalMarketer Lab trial conversion rate
  • Cost per acquisition from paid traffic campaigns by offer and traffic source
  • Return on investment from paid traffic campaigns by offer and traffic source
  • Total number of leads acquired from paid traffic campaigns by offer and traffic source
  • Conversion rates for each step of acquisition funnels
  • Conversion rate for each follow up campaign in relation to acquisition funnels
  • Average time to first response to support ticket
  • Customer satisfaction rating from solved support tickets
  • Unique blog page views
  • Total CTA clicks from blog posts
  • Total number of recommendations made to improve baseline KPIs

Personal Characteristics Required:

  • Organized
  • High attention to detail
  • Analytical
  • Persistent
  • Assertive
  • Data Driven
  • Curious

These job descriptions are reviewed and signed by each employee and used to drive the employee’s day-to-day work, and the evaluation of their performance on the part of the manager.

Step 3 – Promote High-Performers and Exit Poor Performers

Alright let’s look at a breakdown of the titles in this org chart:

Follow these three rules:

Rule 1 – 5-10% Over Market Salaries + Amazing Culture = Low Turnover

The last thing you want is to make a good hire and have that person immediately start looking for the next opportunity. One of the secrets to building a great marketing team is creating consistency. To do that, you need to decrease turnover.

Our rule of thumb is to pay more than the going rate for good people, and create an amazing culture. At DigitalMarketer, we like to have fun. We send each other funny gifs on our internal messaging system, we go out and have dinner and drinks and we don’t take ourselves too seriously.

Here’s an example of what I mean:

But creating an amazing culture for your business can mean any number of things. Is it a studious culture? A serious and professional culture? A laid back, anything goes culture? Whatever it is, consider that culture fit with each new hire.

As for determining the market rate for employees, that’s easy. We let sites like Glass Door, Salary and Payscale tell us.

For example, if we are going to hire a Content Marketing Manager in Austin, Texas we would use this information from Salary.com to determine the proper salary.

hire-a-marketing-team-img3

While this is a wide salary range, when broken into “quartiles” this information becomes very useful:

  • Quartile 1– $72,563 to $80,688
  • Quartile 2– $80,688 to $89,612
  • Quartile 3– $89,612 to $101,782
  • Quartile 4– $101,782 to $112,861

If this is a new hire with no experience in this role, we would hire with a salary offer at the low end of Quartile 1. This information is extremely useful as you give raises to your employees as well.

When your Content Marketing Manager approaches you with a raise to $100,000 per year, you can base that decision on questions like,

“Based on the contribution to the company and the level of training and experience of this Content Marketing Manager, do they deserve a raise that would place them at the high end of Quartile 3?”

Rule 2 – Promote Those That Pass Knowledge Down

Promote those who show an ability and willingness to document what they know and teach it to others.

The fact is processes are more valuable than products.

hire-a-marketing-team-img4

More often than not, if you create a culture of documentation, your promotions will be internal. As a process is created and the company grows, an employee will replace themselves and ascend the ladder to a higher position.

TIP: Create an internal wiki using a WordPress theme like Flatbase or (better yet) use DigitalMarketer’s training products like The Machine, Funnel Blueprint, DigitalMarketer Lab and DigitalMarketer HQ as your knowledge base.

Rule 3 – Three Strikes and You’re Out!

Hiring employees means occasionally making the tough decision to fire employees. Not every hire will work out.

We use a simple system to coach and work with employees that aren’t performing to expectations.

  • Strike 1 – Email Notification – Be clear about the expectation they are failing to meet. Ask them to reply and confirm receipt. The first strike is documented in this email.
  • Strike 2 – Face to Face Meeting – If the behavior continues, schedule a formal meeting to work in-person with the employee. Document the outcome in a follow-up email.
  • Strike 3 – Termination – If the behavior continues to persist, it’s better for both parties if the employee moves on.

Step 4 – Dedicate One Week+ to Onboarding

The entry-level salary for a trained digital marketing pro is north of 70K per year.

At DigitalMarketer, we hire for culture fit and something we call “give a damn.”

Then, we train them.

First, we train them on the core values and mission of the company. For new hires, this often takes place as the last phase of the hiring process.

hire-a-marketing-team-img5

Second, we train them on their job.

This is why we rolled out our mastery classes and certifications.

Our Content Team members are required to receive three certifications:

hire-a-marketing-team-img6

Acquisition Team members are required to receive two certifications:

hire-a-marketing-team-img7

Monetization Team members are required to receive two certifications:

hire-a-marketing-team-img8

And the leaders (Directors and VP’s) of all teams must receive one additional certification:

hire-a-marketing-team-img9

This is how you’ll build a rock star marketing team that actually functions like a team. This is how you get a coordinated team all moving toward the same goal…

… growing your company!

If you’re really interested in growing your business, growing your team is just ONE area you should focus on. You also need to focus on scaling your brand, sales, and traffic.

That’s exactly what we’re focusing this year’s Black Friday Bootcamp on. If you want to learn more, sign up here.

BlackFridayBootcampCTA

The post How To Build A Marketing Dream Team For Your Brand (Even If You Aren’t A Marketer) appeared first on DigitalMarketer.

How would you describe your marketing team?

  • Understaffed?
  • Overworked?
  • Undertrained?
  • Non-existent?

The fact is that digital marketing is no longer an optional extra for small businesses, but even the best business owners don’t have time to figure all this stuff out.

That’s why every business on Planet Earth needs professional marketers ...Read More

How to Use Facebook Advertising Pixels to Create High Converting Ad Campaigns

In 2015 Ryan Deiss, CEO and Founder of DigitalMarketer, predicted that 2015 would be the year of the Great Pixel Land Rush.

ry“Soon all display advertising will be retargeted advertising and the pixel will become even more valuable than the click itself. As larger advertisers continue to buy up ad inventory (and create their own retargeting audiences) those that fail to ‘pixel’ their site visitors won’t be able to afford to advertise.”

At Digital Marketer, we’ve already begun preparations for the “pixel land rush.” We buy traffic today just to place a pixel. Sure … we’re monitoring click costs, cost per lead and all the rest but we’re paying closer and closer attention to a new metric: CPP.”

CPP is Cost Per Pixel.

I agreed with Ryan in 2015 and almost two years later, Ryan’s words are still relevant (and even more so, now)…

Pixels allow us to follow up with people who have visited our website.

The key is that pixels allow you to make TARGETED offers to individuals based off of pages they’ve visited on your website.

For example, we run ads to promote blog posts on “blogging”.11.18_Quotebox1_300w_v2

Then, we retarget the people who read the article with a specific lead magnet for… BLOGGING. (Learn how we do this, here).

It’s much more powerful than making them a broad offer (ex. Digital Marketing)… it allows us to solve a SPECIFIC problem for them.

BUT, pixels can get confusing… especially when it comes to Facebook advertising!

I get a TON of questions about Facebook advertising pixels in DigitalMarketer Engage

… and, since Facebook rolled out a brand new pixel last year, I’m going to clear up all of the confusion. (Before you read any further, make sure the new Facebook pixel base code is installed site wide on your URL(s)).

I’m going to explain the different uses for the Facebook pixel and how YOU can use pixels to create higher converting Facebook ad campaigns. 

3 Ways to Use the Facebook Pixel

There are three very important uses for the Facebook Pixel:

  • Retargeting (building audiences of people who have visited your website, retargeting throughout a sales funnel)
  • Optimization (creating higher converting Facebook campaigns focused on a specific action)
  • Tracking (tracking the performance of a campaign, for example… you can track how many leads or sales were generated from a particular ad)

Let’s start with…

1. Tracking

Facebook’s pixel can be used to track how many times a particular action occurs.

For example, you can track how many leads were generated from a particular Facebook campaign. Or, how many products you sold from a specific ad.

The best way to track SPECIFIC actions that occurred as a result of your Facebook ads is through the use of custom conversions.

Custom conversions are very similar to the old conversion pixels that Facebook used before the new pixel (and that we miss dearly :)).

You can find custom conversions in the business manager menu:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img1

Unfortunately, as of now, you are only allotted 40 custom conversions per Facebook account. So, use them wisely.

Like I said earlier, you’ll want to use custom conversions to denote a success action, like generating a lead or purchasing a product.

To do this, you will want to set up a custom conversion for the URL of whatever page people will visit right after they take whatever action you’re tracking.

For example, if you want to track leads, you’ll create a custom conversion based off of whatever page the person will visit after they enter their contact information.

The only way someone could reach this page is if they opted in with their contact information.

To create the custom conversion, you’ll click the “Create Custom Conversion” button, then enter the URL of the success page.

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img2

After you enter the URL, as you can see above, Facebook will also ask you to choose a category. This doesn’t affect tracking or optimization, just select the category that makes the most sense to you. For this example, I chose “lead”.

You’ll then be prompted to name the custom conversion and to give it a value. If you’re tracking purchases, and the conversion has an actually monetary value, feel free to input that number.

Awesome, you’ve created your custom conversion!11.18_Quotebox2_300w

Now, how do we actually track results back to a specific campaign, ad set, or ad?

Unlike the old conversion pixels, you don’t have to tell Facebook to track a specific custom conversion back to its source.

When creating your campaigns, make sure that you check the “track all conversion from my Facebook pixel” option at the ad level. As long as you do this, Facebook will do the tracking for you!

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img3

Now, where do you view results of the custom conversion(s) that you’re wanting to track?

You’ll want to click the “Customize Columns” button in ads manager when viewing your campaigns:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img4

Then, select the specific custom conversions you’re wanting to track. They will appear as whatever you named them during set up:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img5

Note that you can track the number of conversions, the cost per conversion, and the value (if you input a numerical value when setting up the custom conversion).

You can customize columns at the campaign, ad set, or ad level—this will give you visibility into what’s specific working (and, what’s not working) within your ad campaigns.

FYI: If you’re running website conversion campaign, make sure you use the customize columns button to view the results for your campaign. Many people are mislead because they assume all of the “conversions” reported are the custom conversion they’re optimizing for. Unfortunately, Facebook lumps ALL conversions that have occurred from people who interacted with that particular campaign.

For example, we optimized for the custom conversion of “Customer Avatar” in this campaign. From first glance, it appears as though we’ve generated 21,267 leads. But, because Facebook is now reporting all conversions that have occurred from the people who have interacted with this campaign, you need to dig a little to get the actual number. In this case, we’ve generated 15,476 leads.

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img6

(NOTE: Want The Ultimate Facebook Ad Template Library? Copy & paste these 7 proven Facebook ad campaigns to create low-cost, high-converting ads on demand. Get them here.)

Facebook Ad Templates

2. Optimization

You can use also use custom conversions to tell Facebook what you WANT!

When setting up a Facebook advertising campaign Facebook asks what the objective of your campaign is:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img7

If you’re running traffic to something that’s a simple action, like a Lead Magnet opt-in or a webinar sign up, you should almost ALWAYS use the “Increase conversions on your website” objective. (Learn how this decreased our lead cost by 5x, here).

But how does Facebook know what to optimize for? You tell them—using custom conversions!

You can optimize for one of the custom conversions you already created for tracking (or a new one).

In the case of a traditional 5-step sales funnel, we will optimize for the Lead Magnet.

So, we would use the custom conversion that’s on the page where visitors land DIRECTLY after they opt-in for your Lead Magnet.11.18_Quotebox3_300w

Not only are you telling Facebook EXACTLY what you want from the campaign, you’re also collecting data.

Meaning, Facebook is optimizing your campaign for people who are most like the people who have already opted in. This is powerful as you go to scale your advertising campaigns.

3. Retargeting

Another benefit of the Facebook pixel is that it can be used to create retargeting audiences.

Facebook retargeting audiences are created under the “Audiences” tab in Business Manager.

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img8

To create an audience of people who have interacted with your Facebook pixel (any pages on your site), click create audience, custom audience, then website traffic, and you’ll find a plethora of options:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img10

First, you can target anyone who’s visited your website as a whole. This one is self explanatory. Keep in mind that if you have your pixel installed on multiple websites you can select those different URLs from the drop down.

Secondly, you can target people who visit specific web pages. So, if you’d like to target everyone who has visited your product page, a specific thank you page, etc. this is the option to chose.

Thirdly, you can target people who visit specific web pages but not others. We use this method to retarget people throughout our 5-step funnels. See below:

facebook-pixel-campaigns-img11

To learn how we set up the dynamic, full funnel retargeting click here.

This option allows you to DYNAMICALLY retarget people who have visited one page but not the other. Want to target people who opted in for your Lead Magnet, but didn’t buy your next offer? This audience is for you.

Fourthly, people who haven’t visited in a certain amount of time. Use this option to retarget people who have been away from your site for a long period of time. Reengage them with content or a special discount.

The next option is brand new and very exciting. You can retarget people based off the amount of time spent on your website.

Facebook will create audiences of people who are in the following percentile for time spent on your website:

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Retarget these people with higher dollar offers as they’re some of your “hottest” and most qualified retargeting audiences.

Lastly, you can create a custom combination. Here you can get even more specific and retarget people based off of the number of times they’ve visited your site in a specific duration of time (and if it was mobile or desktop):

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Whichever option you choose, these are PERFECT to create lookalike audiences from in order to scale.

You can create a lookalike audience based off of any of the custom audiences we covered above.

For the lookalike audiences, Facebook creates an audience of people who are most like the people in that custom audience.

To create a lookalike, simply check the audience you’d like to use as the source then click actions and create lookalike:

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Facebook will populate the lookalike audience as a new audience under the Audience tab and you’ll be able to target this audience in a new ad set. Again, these are AWESOME to use for scale. Once you have a campaign that’s working, simply create a lookalike audience off of that success page.

That’s it! You’ve mastered the Facebook pixel (or the parts you really need to know for success, anyways :)).

As you can see, it’s almost impossible to run successful Facebook ads without using the pixel.

It’s essential for the tracking, optimization, retargeting, and scale of your Facebook campaigns.

(NOTE: Want The Ultimate Facebook Ad Template Library? Copy & paste these 7 proven Facebook ad campaigns to create low-cost, high-converting ads on demand. Get them here.)

Facebook Ad Templates

The post How to Use Facebook Advertising Pixels to Create High Converting Ad Campaigns appeared first on DigitalMarketer.

In 2015 Ryan Deiss, CEO and Founder of DigitalMarketer, predicted that 2015 would be the year of the Great Pixel Land Rush.

ry“Soon all display advertising will be retargeted advertising and the pixel will become even more valuable than ...Read More

The Ultimate Guide to Scaling Paid Traffic Campaigns

Interested in taking your converting campaigns and scaling them to greater heights?

There’s a few things you need to know—fortunately, you’ve come to the right place.

Whether you’re just starting out, or refining your tried and tested practices, this round up of our best resources on scaling traffic to your business 1will point you in the right direction.

Now, go play in traffic :)!

The Ad Grid: How to Build Traffic Campaigns that Convert Higher and Scale Faster

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The process laid out in this post is three years in the making.

The Ad Grid is DigitalMarketer’s process for organizing and systemizing our paid traffic strategy. It takes the guesswork out of creating an ad campaign.

It’s a 7-step process that dramatically increases the odds of creating a paid traffic campaign that is an absolute home run.

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Check it out before you launch your next campaign.

How to Leverage Facebook Data to Scale Your Ad Campaigns

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It’s not tremendously difficult to build an ad campaign that generates a few leads. The real trick is SCALING that campaign.

The reality is that every ad campaign eventually FATIGUES and must be exposed to “fresh blood.”

In this case study, Molly Pittman will show you a free tool that makes breathing new life into ad campaigns a cinch.

You’ll see how DigitalMarketer is able to find 100’s of thousands of new prospects in just a few minutes of research.

Episode 20: 5 Ways to Scale Paid Traffic Campaigns

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Congratulations! You are seeing some success with your Facebook ad campaigns.

It’s time to find new audiences like the ones that are converting and cut back on those that aren’t.

The Perpetual Traffic experts (Keith, Ralph and Molly) will show you five ways to scale and optimize your successful ad campaigns in Episode 20 of the podcast.

Episode 71: The Michigan Method: A Strategy for Scaling Ad Campaigns

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Are you having problems controlling your Facebook ads and keeping your conversion costs in check as you scale?

Take back control from the Facebook ad platform using the Michigan Method, the “multivariate testing technique on steroids.” Ralph Burns reveals how to use this strategy (and the origins of its name), so you can get the best ad results.

Episode 16: Paid Traffic Q&A: Cold Traffic Offers, Scaling Campaigns and Power Editor

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Without a doubt, you’re going to have questions. Buying media is no easy feat!

That’s why, in Episode 16 of Perpetual Traffic, the experts answered listener questions about buying website traffic.

The questions come from the Facebook Ads University and DigitalMarketer Engage Facebook communities and answer frequently asked questions about scaling campaigns, Power Editor, and running traffic to cold offers.

Episode 37: The 5 Biggest Facebook Ad Campaign Mistakes

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In Episode 37, the Perpetual Traffic experts are sharing the biggest mistakes they see people making while running paid traffic… and their solutions for not falling into the same traps.

If you’re running traffic on Facebook and want to see better results, and more return on your Facebook advertising — you need to make sure you’re not committing any of these mistakes. And if you are — fix them using the experts’ suggestions.

You’ll learn…

  • How people are falling flat while optimizing and scaling their ads (<< This is the biggest mistake Molly sees advertisers making).
  • The biggest mistake most advertisers are making when it comes to their targeting (<< and the sweet spot you’ll want your target audience to fall into).
  • The Facebook targeting option that will get you better results, and better targeted results for your ads.
  • How your campaign objective should be used to give your ads a long and fruitful life.

And that’s that!

But, wait—we’re not done yet!

If you’re really interested in scaling your business, traffic is just ONE area you should focus on. You also need to focus on scaling your brand, sales, and team.

That’s exactly what we’re focusing this year’s Black Friday Bootcamp on. If you want to learn more, sign up here.

BlackFridayBootcampCTA

The post The Ultimate Guide to Scaling Paid Traffic Campaigns appeared first on DigitalMarketer.

Interested in taking your converting campaigns and scaling them to greater heights?

There’s a few things you need to know—fortunately, you’ve come to the right place.

Whether you’re just starting out, or refining your tried and tested practices, this round up of our best resources on scaling traffic ...Read More

9 Important Lessons Learned after Generating $150 Million in Sales over These Last 8 Years—Part 1

I’m now approaching my 8th year of running businesses. It’s been a wild ride, and the pace of learning has been fast. To date, my various businesses (one selling information products, one selling seminars, and one selling advertising) have generated over $150 million in sales. At times, it feels like I’ve probably made the same […]

The post 9 Important Lessons Learned after Generating $150 Million in Sales over These Last 8 Years—Part 1 appeared first on MOBE – My Own Business Education.

I’m now approaching my 8th year of running businesses. It’s been a wild ride, and the pace of learning has been fast. To date, my various businesses (one selling information products, one selling seminars, and one selling advertising) have generated over $150 million in sales. ...Read More